Euro area unemployment rate down to 10.9% but youth unemployment still high.

The latest EU unemployment statistics tell us that unemployment in the euro area was down to 10.9% in July 2015, down from 11.6% in July 2014.

But let’s just look at the Irish figures. The Irish unemployment rate is down to 9.5%, from 11.3% in July 2014.

Germany, the Czech republic and Malta are among the lowest in the EU, while Greece and Spain are the highest.

However, youth unemployment in the EU is still high. 20.4% of under 25s in the EU28 are unemployed, and that figure is 21.8% in the euro area.

Greece, Spain, Croatia and Italy have the highest youth unemployment rate in the euro area.

It was reported in Irish media in the last week or so that while emigration figures are down, new graduates are still leaving Ireland.

More than half of last years emigrants over 15 held a third level degree. Despite unemployment levels falling in Ireland, the number of graduates leaving the country is still high.

It is estimated that since the economic crisis began, over 223,000 under 25s have left the country.

The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) has expressed concern at new Population and Migration Estimates figures released last week by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

You can delve into the CSO stats on the National Youth Council website.

Geographical coverage

The euro area (EA19) includes Belgium, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal, Slovenia, Slovakia and Finland.

The European Union (EU28) includes Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Croatia, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, the Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Euro area and EU28 unemployment rates

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